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Lay’s Logo

Lay’s Logo
Lay’s Logo PNG

Lay’s is an American brand of potato chips. It started in the 1930s when Herman Lay bought the Barrett Food Company and renamed it H.W. Lay Lingo & Company. Since 1965, PepsiCo has held the rights to the popular snacks trademark.

Meaning and History

Lay’s Logo History
Evolution of the Lay’s Logo

Lay’s has a recognizable corporate identity. The company carried out a global redesign several times, but its name was always present on the logo. The goal of gaining popularity has been set for the logo since its opening because chips are excellent snacks that you can eat anytime, anywhere. At the same time, the management focused as much as possible on the brand and its products: over the years of its existence, it changed the design of the emblem six times, focusing on modernity and demand. The logo’s key element was and remained the name of the founder of the company – Herman Lay. But first, he named it HW Lay Lingo & Co.

1932 – 1965

Lay’s Logo 1932-1965

The debut version indicated the direction in which the development of identity later moved. The original emblem depicts crockery – a saucepan, vat, cauldron, or deep bowl for food. She directly says that this is food. At the bottom is a wave-shaped bracket that resembles a hot cooking surface. The wavy line is also present on the capital “L.” Its right segment looks like a sharp spike and extends beyond the middle of the mark. The lowercase “y” has the stem aligned and downward, and the top of that letter looks like a “u” with curled serifs.

1965 – 1986

Lay’s Logo 1965-1986

The debut emblem is the white “Lay’s” inscription, depicted inside a red rectangle. The corners of the geometric shape are rounded. The word is stretched vertically. The letters don’t have serifs. The protruding L, y, and apostrophe are colored red for original contrast.

1986 – 1997

Lay’s Logo 1986-1997

The general concept and color palette have been preserved. Only the forms have changed. Now “Lay’s” is made in italic font, in which there are not as many corners as in the previous version. The rectangle is gone – it is replaced by a wide red outline that runs along with the entire text.

1997 – 2003

Lay’s Logo 1997-2003

In 1997, the company began using a logo similar to the Walkers graphic. It is based on simple contrasting colors. Aggressive red looks good in combination with calm yellow.

The round potato chip in the background symbolizes the sun. In front of him is a bright curving ribbon with the inscription “Lay’s.” The white letters have small blue shadows that give the word a three-dimensional effect.

This version of the logo is still found on Lay’s Stax lids, Lay’s Deli Style Original packaging, and some Frito-Lay trucks.

2003 – 2007

Lay’s Logo 2003-2007

At the end of 2003, the designers turned the logo counterclockwise. Because of this, the inscription is slightly upward. The changes also affected the letter outlines: now they are not blue, but burgundy. The word “Brand” appeared in small print. Added a gradient that is formed by the red palette.

2007 – 2019

Lay’s Logo 2007-2019

In 2007, the developers replaced the 2D sun chip with a 3D yellow ball from the Frito-Lay logo. The colors are softer thanks to the use of golden outlines. The font has slightly changed: a short-stroke connects ” a” and “y” in the brand name.

2019 – present

Lay’s Logo 2019-present

Twelve years after the redesign, the company redesigned the logo again, following the principle “the simpler, the better.” Updates touched on minor details. The letter “y” in the word “Lay’s” now has a loop. Some of the shadows and outlines have disappeared. There is no familiar “Brand” inscription either – it was removed as unnecessary.

Font and Colors of the Emblem

Lay’s Emblem

Stability and respect for the roots of the company can be traced to Lay’s corporate identity. The brand name is still a key element of the logo. Until 1997, it occupied the entire space; then, it received a background in the form of a fried potato wedge. Another important element is the dishes. Designers eventually turned it into a rectangle and then into a ribbon with a large inscription still used today.

From the printed form, the text passed into a semi-handwritten, italic, with a slight slant. That is, there are several types of typefaces in the logo. In particular, Helvetica Neue and Hobo. In some places, they are combined; in others, they are supplemented with individual touches.

The color scheme was vibrant from the start. For maximum appeal, the designers chose six eye-catching colors: Metallic Sunburst (# 957531), White, Pastel Yellow (# FDF597), Spanish Yellow (# F1B11B), Pigment Red (# EF1C24), and Blood Animal (# AB0E14).