CounterMail Logo

CounterMail Logo
CounterMail Logo PNG

CounterMail is a Swedish company that owns a high-security email service. It is also a provider that provides a paid service for receiving confidential and secure emails in its database. Users’ emails have a high level of encryption, so only the sender and the recipient can see the information they contain. Everything is hidden: subject, headers, attached attachments, content, and even the IP address. Encryption is done using the OpenPGP protocol. The founder of the anonymous service is Simon Persson from Stockholm. Domain name registration date – 2008. The actual launch time of the system – was 2010—the location of diskless servers and headquarters in Sweden.

Meaning and History

CounterMail Symbol

What is CounterMail?

CounterMail is a paid email service with total privacy protection and is owned by a company from Sweden. The anonymity of emails is maintained through the implementation of the OpenPGP protocol. Computer programmer Simon Persson created the service. Registration of the domain name was held in 2008, and the launch of the mail system – was in 2010.

As Simon Persson admits, the prehistory of his brand began in 1983, when he received his first computer. By today’s standards, it was an exotic, ancient, and low-powered device: 3.5Mhz processor, 48k RAM, Spectrum model. But this was enough to arouse teenagers’ interest in the digital world. When all his peers were into games, he took up programming. For him, it became subject number one. The rest moved to second place because Persson has been busy creating utilities ever since.

In the late 1980s, he became interested in cryptography and hacking. The young man realized even then that IT security is the future. He clearly understood: that the computerization of society would only grow, and companies would migrate to virtual space and start transmitting information over the Internet. And it would need strong protection. Simon began to master this industry, studied and practiced a lot, as he realized from the example of wars: data security is a matter of life and death. After all, reliable encryption can save lives, while weak encryption can ruin them.

As a result, in 1999, the young specialist began implementing cryptography in most of his programs. Simon Persson used HushMail to communicate and work, but in 2007, the young man realized that the service could disable user protection. And there was no other mail service with OpenPGP end-to-end encryption. So he decided to create what he needed himself: a server that stored only encrypted emails, with no passwords or logins. In 2008, Persson obtained a domain registration, and two years later (in 2010) launched his mail service with full security.

The CounterMail logo shows a harmonious combination of graphics and text. And it’s designed so that you can easily use it as a standalone icon for a mobile app or a website. The upper inscription consists of the original futuristic lowercase letters. They have smooth curves, rounded corners, and bold lines. These symbols are so twisted that they are more reminiscent of the schematic designation of some automobile or sports track than the linguistic signs of the alphabet.

Of particular interest is the “N,” “E,” and “M.” They are composed entirely of sloping elements, with no straight lines or angles. The “R” is also curious. Its right leg is the opposite: it rests on the sharp end of the diagonal, and the broad part of the slope is directed upward. The underside of “L” is elongated because it bears a lock made up of three equal-sized fragments. Above them, as expected, is the shackle in the form of a staple. This detail symbolizes the firm protection of the postal service against encroachment by unauthorized persons. This concept is confirmed by the lower inscription, made in the same style as the name.

Font and Colors of the Emblem

CounterMail Emblem

The text part of the CounterMail logo is typed in a special typeface that was created individually. Its characters are reminiscent of the Nasalization typeface used in the old NASA emblem, dubbed “the worm.” The color scheme is two-part: it includes pastel green and gray. They are located on a white background.