Texas Rangers Logo

Texas Rangers LogoTexas Rangers Logo PNG

The entire identity, including the Texas Rangers logo, reflects the team’s professional affiliation and philosophy. The emblem focuses on the brand name, hometown, and adherence to traditions.

Texas Rangers: Brand overview

Founded:1961
Founder:Rangers Baseball Express, LLC
Headquarters:
Arlington, Texas, U.S.
Website:mlb.com

The Texas Rangers are a professional baseball club that has competed in the MLB since 2000. The team is part of the AL, representing the Western Division, and is based in Arlington, Texas. It was founded in 1961.

The franchise’s original location was in Washington, D.C. At that time, the club was called “Washington Senators” and owned by Elwood Richard Quesada. In 1963, he sold it to James Johnson and James Lemon. They managed the team until 1968. In 1969, the club was taken over by Bob Short. He opened a new era for the team, planning a move to Arlington.

Texas Rangers Symbol

On September 21, 1971, almost all AL members voted for the relocation. Initially, the franchise was planned to stay in its new location only for the 1972 season, but things turned out differently. In 1980, it was bought from Brad Corbett by oil magnate Eddie Chiles and, nine years later, sold to an investment group led by George Bush and Richard Rainwater. The deal cost $89 million. From 1998 to 2010, the club owner was Tom Hicks, and then the baseball company Rangers Baseball Express, which owns the team to this day.

The team’s debut name wasn’t associated with the rangers. The Texas Rangers were named by Robert Short in 1971. The new name was given in honor of the famous Texas agency, created in 1823 by Stephen F. Austin.

The franchise’s branding underwent several stages before becoming current. The earliest version dates back to 1961. Even then, it was done in primary colors – red, blue, and white. Other elements either disappeared or were reworked over time.

Meaning and History

Texas Rangers Logo History

Having come a long way from “Washington Senators” to “Texas Rangers,” the baseball team, in both instances, associated its visual image with the name. The debut logo featured an athlete pitching a ball in front of the Capitol in Washington, D.C., where senators convene. After rebranding, versions appeared with a cowboy hat and the administrative map of Texas. The only constant over time remained the palette: the combination of blue and red was approved in the year the original emblem was released.

What is Texas Rangers?

In baseball, the “Texas Rangers” are a professional baseball team based in the economic center of North Texas. It has been based in the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington area since 1972 and previously played in Washington, D.C. Its previous name was “Washington Senators.” The club was created to replace the previous “Washington Senators” team, which moved to Minnesota.

1961 – 1971

Washington Senators Logo 1961-1971

The first logo in the expansion history of “Washington,” which lasted ten years until the team moved to Texas in 1972, consisted of a white circle inside which the White House and a baseball player throwing a ball were depicted. The outline of the White House was done in blue ink, and the player’s contour in red. Above the building was the inscription “The Senators.”

1972 – 1980

Texas Rangers Logo 1972-1980

With the move to Texas, the club changed its name to “Texas Rangers” and accordingly changed the concept of the logo. The new logo depicted a white ball with a cowboy hat on it. Above the drawing, the team’s name was written in red. The outline of the drawing itself became completely blue.

1981

Texas Rangers Logo 1981

A slightly modified version of the previous logo appeared in 1981. Artists improved the graphics of the drawing, which depicted a baseball and a cowboy hat, symbolizing the cowboy state of Texas. The inscription “Texas Rangers” remained in the same place, slightly changing the font.

1982 – 1983

Texas Rangers Logo 1982-1983

The shape of Texas was naturally taken as the basis for the new “Rangers” logo. On the blue background of the state, two huge red “TR” letters were placed, with a small white star inside one of them. A white ball also symbolically appears on the logo.

1984 – 1993

Texas Rangers Logo 1984-1993

The 1984 logo somewhat resembles the previous one, as it also depicts a blue drawing of the state of Texas, but now with the addition of a red and white outline around the edges. The letters “TR” were replaced with the word “Rangers,” highlighted in italics in the center of the drawing. As with the previous logo, a ball is also present on the emblem of these years.

1994 – 2002

Texas Rangers Logo 1994-2002

The new logo received a diamond-shaped base with additional thin vertical stripes. The focus is on the silver five-pointed star, around which a dark red ring is placed. Phrases “Texas Rangers” and “Baseball Club,” placed on the red ring, separate two small baseballs.

2003 – today

Texas Rangers Logo 2003-Present

The modern version was created by New York designer Skilo Brands in agreement with the Rangers Baseball Express and approved by Major League Baseball. It was adopted in 2003 and is based on the previous version. The logo’s shape is a round seal or classic rondel with an emphasized center and round inscription on a wide band.

At the center is a baseball with two “Christmas tree” stitches. It serves as a background for the letter “T,” executed in Old English style with protrusions in the form of spikes. Next is a two-tone ribbon, divided by a thin line into red and blue zones. At the top are two stars, and at the bottom is the inscription “Texas” – “Rangers.” A thin border runs along the edge.

Font and Colors

Texas Rangers Emblem

Seven different logos were developed for the “Texas Rangers.” They aren’t grouped by images: the first with the Capitol, the next two with a cowboy hat, the next two with the map of Texas, and the last pair of logos with a rondel. This evolution reflects the club management’s quest to find the most successful form – simple, understandable, and yet meaningful, reflecting all necessary information. In the emblems of 1972-1993 and the current version, baseball is depicted realistically. In the 1961-1971 and 1994-2002 versions, it is played in the round shape of the logo.

Texas Rangers Symbol

Two emblems use the handwritten font. In 1972, a version with a streamlined print font appeared – without sharp transitions and corners, with smooth lines and serifs. Now, one of the Old English lettering versions is used – with horizontal spikes in the middle part.

The official palette was approved immediately and has always been present in an unchanged form. It consists of a combination of white, red, and dark blue colors.

Texas Rangers color codes

Royal BlueHex color:#003278
RGB:35 57 116
CMYK:100 67 0 23
Pantone:PMS 288 C
RedHex color:#c0111f
RGB:192 33 38
CMYK:0 100 63 12
Pantone:PMS 200 C

FAQ

What does the “Texas Rangers” logo represent?

The “Texas Rangers” logo looks like a peculiar rondel with a baseball in the center. In the center is a stylized red letter T. The ball is placed in a round frame with two joined half-rings – red (above) and blue (below). It has the team’s name written on it, and two five-pointed stars separate the words. The letters are white, with triangular crests in the middle.

Is George Bush the owner of the “Texas Rangers” team?

It is known that George Bush, along with a group of investors, bought a portion of the “Texas Rangers'” shares. He acquired 2%, for which he paid over 600 thousand dollars. The politician sold his stake in 1998 before becoming president. Thus, he is no longer the owner of the sports team.

What color is the “Texas Rangers'” jersey?

The “Texas Rangers'” home jersey is white with red sleeves. During away games, players wear gray jerseys with blue sleeves. In the case of ALT 1, the top of the uniform is light blue, ALT 2 is dark blue, and ALT 3 is red.

Where are the “Texas Rangers” located?

The Texas Rangers moved from Washington to Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington in 1971. Since 2020, their home stadium has been Globe Life Field.