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Washington Redskins Logo

Washington Redskins Logo
Washington Redskins Logo PNG

Washington Redskins is an American club of professional football players and is part of the National Football League. The team is a representative of the NFC East Division and was formed in 1932. The club is located in the metropolitan area of Washington, DC.

The franchise began with the Boston Braves team. A year after its inception, it was renamed Boston Redskins – based on its location. Then George Preston Marshall, founder, and first owner, moved her to Washington. This happened in 1937.

Washington redskins emblem

In 1969, Marshall passed away, and a controlling stake was bought by Edward Bennett Williams, who was the majority owner of the club until 1974. Then part of the shares from him was acquired by Jack Kent Cooke, automatically receiving the status of an equal co-owner. This was made possible thanks to the fact that he already had a 25 percent share of the Washington Redskins: he received it through a deal with George Preston Marshall during his lifetime – when he suffered a stroke and was unable to conduct business actively.

From 1985 to 1997, Cooke himself led the club and then created his foundation. In 1999, the controlling interest went to Daniel Marc Snyder, who currently heads the franchise.

Washington redskins symbol

Interestingly, Redskins is the first NFL team with a personal marching band and sports anthem (Hail to the Redskins song). The first name went to her from the eponymous baseball club Braves. After moving to Washington, she retained the Redskins option, merely changing the location – from Boston to Washington. Now around the name associated with the image of the native Indian, scandals do not cease since the “red-skinned” is considered a politically incorrect, derogatory, and insulting word.

Meaning and History

Washington Redskins Logo History
Washington Redskins Logo Evolution

Although the brand logo has undergone several cardinal changes over almost a 90-year history, visually, it has always remained within the Indian theme. The franchise’s official colors are brown, yellow, white, burgundy, and black. At the same time, not all of them are present in each version of graphic symbolism.

1932

Boston Braves Logo 1932

At the beginning of a sports career, the team took the logo from the Boston baseball team. It was used until 1933. It depicts the red head of a representative of America’s indigenous population in a traditional feather headdress. The element is made in the profile, turned to the left. Facial features and details are formed from white lines. All parts have a double edging in the colors of the base palette.

1933 – 1936

Boston Redskins Logo 1933-1936

 

The emblem of this period is associated with the renaming of the group to Boston Redskins. She repeats the previous version, but not wholly – some differences can be traced between them. Firstly, another style of drawing is close to realistic. Secondly, the details are a yellow circle covering the central element, small strokes on the face, white background, black hair, and two feathers. Moreover, the head of the Indian is already turned to the right.

1937 – 1951

Washington Redskins Logo 1937-1951

Moving the franchise to Washington brought her an updated logo. A Native American head profile is circled in yellow. The hair is now dark brown and in the braid – a white garter. The feathers have changed shade – now they are brownish-red. The face and neck of the Indian are tanned, with a light redhead. Strict features, a serious look.

1952 – 1959

Washington Redskins Logo 1952-1959

In 1952, the team began to use a different symbolism – with the most realistic image of the representative of the authentic American population. Designers removed the yellow circle, leaving a free white space. The hair was made jet black, her skin brown, and two feathers yellow and red.

1960 – 1964

Washington Redskins Logo 1960-1964

The logo of these years directly echoes the debut version in red and white. In 1960, the club again returned the sketchy silhouette of the head of an Indian, turned to the right. There are no exact outlines in it – only the general lines form the face, neck, two feathers, and hair tied into a bun. The background used is a red substrate. There is also a white border.

1965 – 1969

Washington Redskins Logo 1965-1969

During these years, the franchise attempted to significantly alter the logo, leaving only feathers from the usual image. Everything else has been removed. The result is a concise graphic sign with a sharp spear on which two feathers hang. The color scheme is also changed: it is actively used yellow in combination with white.

1970 – 1971

Washington Redskins Logo 1970-1971

Vince Lombardi, a Washington Redskins coach, insisted on a radically new logo. The logo of that period shows the capital “R,” reflecting the team’s name. The sign is placed on a white background in the center of the circle. The letter itself, like the edging of the graphic symbol, is painted in dark red. On the right side are two white feathers with yellow tips – a reference to the Native American theme.

1972 – 1981

Washington Redskins Logo 1972-1981

In 1972, the club decided to return the logo of 1933-1936 and replaced “R” with a representative of the indigenous population. A yellow ring appeared on the logo again, inside of which is the head of an Indian looking to the right. He has dark brown skin with a red tint and charcoal-black hair with white feathers. Two side feathers on the edging line remained unchanged.

1982

Washington Redskins logo 1982

This version is the result of a marketing requirement. The developers “pressed” the side feathers to the ring because they did not fit into the round stickers for helmets. Also, the designers turned the Indian in the opposite direction – to the left.

1983 – present

Washington Redskins Logo 1983-Present

In 1983, the sticker manufacturer began to use more flexible material, so the feathers were returned to their hanging look. The current version is a simplified repetition of the 1972 logo with minimal amendments. Among them: dark gray shadows instead of black on the nose, in the corner of the mouth and on the cheekbones, thickened lines on the face, even shadows under the chin and neck. It also changed skin color for a couple of tones. This version is under development approved by the former head of the National Congress of American Indians Walter “Blackie” Wetzel.