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DMC Logo

DeLorean (DMC) Logo
DeLorean (DMC) Logo PNG

In 1985’s highest-grossing film, Back to the Future, a genius scientist converted a DeLorean car into a time machine. But the company DMC, which produces this model, went bankrupt three years before the film’s release. It so happened that its creator, John Zachary DeLorean, conflicted with the leadership of the General Motors Company. Under the influence of strong and influential competitors, the businessman was accused of drug trafficking. As a result, he spent all the money on litigation. By the time John proved his innocence, he had nothing left, and he was forced to stop the production of cars.

Meaning and History

DeLorean DMC Logo History
Evolution of the DeLorean DMC Logo

DeLorean Motor Company managed to release only one model of a sports car in 8,550 copies. The first sample appeared in 1975. In 1982, the owner of the company lost the support of investors because a case was fabricated against him and then completely lost the car business. General Motors did what it wanted: it got revenge on its former employee for the revelatory book.

The original company logo consisted of only three letters: “DMC.” It was purchased along with parts when Stephen Wynne decided to revive the iconic brand. The new DeLorean brand has nothing to do with the old one, apart from their common name and visual identity elements.

1975 – 1982

DeLorean Motor Company Logo 1975-1982

The first brand name was designed by Phil Gibbon, an artist from the English city of Brighton. He used the stylized abbreviation “DMC” to make it symmetrical. The letter “D” looked like a mirrored “C” because it lacked a vertical stroke on the right side. The “M,” in turn, was shaped like an inverted “E.”

The inspiration for the logo was the look of the cars. Particular attention was drawn to the gull-wing doors that opened upward. They were supposed to be imitated by the “D” and “C” on the sides. To show the technical progress, Phil Gibbon made the design three-dimensional. To do this, he complimented the image with a silvery gradient and thin gray outlines.

There was also an alternative version of the symbol – with the inscription “DELOREAN.” It used the same unusual font as the main logo. The company name consisted of white letters and was inside a black rectangle. Such graphic designations were typical for the style of the 1970s.

1995 – 2008

DeLorean Motor Company Logo 1995-2008

In 1995, Stephen Wynne revived a long-forgotten automotive brand. He bought out the DMC logo to associate the new company with the old one, though they are two unrelated organizations. The reworked abbreviation has become completely black and lost its volume. An additional inscription, “DELOREAN MOTOR COMPANY,” appeared at the bottom. It used a thin capital sans-serif typeface.

2008 – present

DeLorean Motor Company Logo 2008-present

The classic silver palette made a comeback in 2008 with a three-dimensional effect. The letter “M” is slightly lighter than the others. In the modern version, the black outlines are complemented by the same dark shadows. White spaces are wider than usual, making the abbreviation easier to read and more elegant. Below, as before, is the full name of the manufacturer. The font has remained largely unchanged, but the lettering is white and has a thin black outline.

The 2D print version contains the black word “DMC.” Each letter is surrounded by two lines – white and black. The outer frame is interrupted at the corners, which creates a visual effect of volume.

Font and Colors of the Emblem

DeLorean (DMC) Emblem

When John DeLorean decided to create his dream car, he did not think long about choosing a badge for the radiator grille and used the abbreviated name of the company – DMC. This abbreviation has remained the main distinctive symbol of DeLorean Motor Company. Due to the missing stroke of the letter “D,” the inscription is a perfect palindrome because it reads the same from left to right and vice versa. The designers made the emblem three-dimensional to emphasize visual harmony, adding contrasting lines (silver and white) along the edges. The fact that “D,” “M,” and “C” are directed in different directions speaks of the brand’s orientation to all parts of the world, its global nature, and the desire to enter foreign markets outside the United States.

The current DeLorean Company (DMC), which is historically unrelated to its predecessor, uses the Zapf Huminist font, also known as Bitstream Optima, for its logo. And based on the abbreviation icon, the Rustproof Body typeface was developed.

DeLorean (DMC) Symbol

Black, white, silver, and gray in several shades are the base of the color scheme. They are combined in such a way that the emblem appears metallic and three-dimensional.