Leffe Logo

Leffe Logo
Leffe Logo PNG

Belgium has its premium beer, Leffe, fruity ale with a slightly spicy edge. The brand is owned by the international brewing corporation Anheuser-Busch InBev through its division InBev Belgium. All Leffe varieties are produced in the city of Leuven in the province of Flemish Brabant – in the same place where Stella Artois is made. Instead of using standard advertising media, the company uses an online newsletter known as Leffervescense to familiarize customers with the range.

Meaning and History

Leffe Logo History
Evolution of the Leffe Logo

The actual start of the beer brand was in 1952, when the small commercial brewery Lootvoet agreed with Notre-Dame de Leffe, turning the abbey’s brewing tradition into a brand. Then Lootvoet became part of AB InBev, while the contract was not terminated. As a result, the Catholic monastery still profits from sales, and the company has the right to use its history for marketing purposes.

The advertisement implies that Leffe is prepared according to the original recipes of the monks who founded the abbey in 1152 and 88 years later began to brew beer to offer it to pilgrims instead of drinking water. During epidemics, water was unsafe, and all infections died in beer due to special heat treatment. Over the following centuries, the monastery was plundered and destroyed several times, after which it was sold in parts. It was only restored in 1902, but the brewing tradition, forgotten in 1809, is a thing of the past: since then, alcohol has not been brewed at Notre-Dame de Leffe. However, some monks decided to capitalize on the glorious history of the abbey and sold the right to use the Leffe brand to a commercial company.

Created in 1952, AB InBev uses a variety of advertising mediums to underline the brand’s connection, created in 1952, with the ancient Catholic monastery. And one of them is the logo, which depicts the abbey building in the form of a colorful stained-glass window. He has several versions.

1152 – the 2010s

Leffe Logo 1152

To be more precise, the first Leffe emblem appeared not in 1152 but 800 years later because this alcohol brand did not exist before. In 1952, representatives of Notre-Dame de Leffe entered into a deal with the brewery, allowing them to turn the monastic traditions into a brand. This is how Leffe and his debut logo appeared, based on the coat of arms. It was stylized as a sandy yellow sheet of parchment placed in a red-orange frame with a gold gradient at the top. Inside was an image of the abbey in the form of a multi-colored stained-glass window of the same shape as a large shield. Below it was the brand name in black, and even lower was the red inscription “Bière d’Abbaye-Abdijbier.”

the 2010s – today

Leffe Logo

After the redesign, all logo elements appeared on an inverted triangular golden-orange shield. The frame’s shape has changed: now it resembles an arch because the lower segment is missing. The designers used it for it and the inscription “ANNO 1240” (at the bottom), the same shade of khaki. The stained glass drawing and the word “Leffe” remained in their original places, but the red phrase “Abbaye de Abdij van appeared between them.” And the phrase “Bière d’Abbaye-Abdijbier” was removed.

At the same time, another variant is often found on bottles – with an old-style shield, which, unlike the very first logo, has smooth, rounded outlines. In it, the word “ANNO” and the date “1240” are on the sides of the stained-glass window, and in the lower right corner under the “Leffe” are written in two lines “Bière Belge d’Abbaye” and “Belgisch Abdijbier.”

Font and Colors of the Emblem

Leffe Emblem

Since the company that owns the Leffe brand pays Notre-Dame de Leffe for the right to use its story as a marketing base, it tries to reflect the connection between beer and abbey at all levels. Therefore, the emblem depicts the facade of a Catholic monastery, stylized as a stained-glass window, which is often found in places of worship.

The Old English script of the word “Leffe” also shows a long-brewing tradition because it is associated with something old, medieval. The phrase “Abbaye de Abdij van” is written in one of the versions of the Old English typeface, and for the phrase “ANNO 1240,” the designers chose a bold serif with shortened symmetrical serifs.

Leffe Symbol

The color scheme of the logo is varied. The golden yellow base mimics the tone of beer. It is complemented by a frame with a khaki gradient, a black brand name, and a red inscription. But the stained-glass window is very colorful: it contains green, blue, white, brown, golden, orange.