Twisted Tea Logo

Twisted Tea LogoTwisted Tea Logo PNG

Twisted Tea is one of the many brands of alcoholic beverages owned by the American brewery The Boston Beer Company, Inc., the history of its manufacturer began in 1984 when C. James Koch began brewing amber lager at home in the kitchen. As for the Twisted Tea brand, it appeared almost 20 years later – in 2001. It was created by bold experimenters who combined beer and iced tea with lemon.

Meaning and History

Twisted Tea Logo History

Alcohol from malted barley has a strength of 5%, which is indicated on cans and bottles. At the same time, it is positioned as “strong green tea” – a phrase that complements the brand name in the logo. And this is not just an advertising slogan: the drink is made from tea leaves with the addition of real lemon. And the malt only emphasizes the piquancy of the taste.

The Boston Beer Company experts proceeded from the fact that the product must fully comply with the inscriptions on the packaging. So they found the perfect recipe by balancing the ratio of alcohol and other ingredients. Over time, new varieties of Twisted Tea were invented: with peach, raspberry, half and half, and so on. The last option imitates the Arnold Palmer soft drink, where lemonade and tea are mixed equally.

All types of this unusual beer have a common logo, which has changed only once in the 20 years of the brand’s existence. Both versions of the brand name contain several inscriptions and the symbol of the rising sun.

Old

Twisted Tea Old Logo

The first malt drink logos were bright and multicomponent. In the center was an image of an oval sun with 18 elongated rays. Because of its shape, the emblem looked more like a burning star or a flash of an explosion. The middle was light yellow, and a darker shade was used for the rays. Two orange stripes were drawn along the edges of each process, creating an effect of depth.

The sun served as the backdrop for the blue word “TWISTED TEA” arched out. The first “T”s were slightly taller than the others. At the same time, both words seemed voluminous because of the light blue lines. Additional inscriptions were next to the name: “The Original” on top and “Hard Iced Tea” on the bottom. They were framed on the sides with curved stripes. On the packages, the logo was accompanied by information about the product. On the lower beams stood out the word “Naturally Sweetened” and just below it, “5%” inside a small blue sun with the words “Alcohol By Volume.” The last phrase was in the form of an arch, curved in the opposite direction, and was decorated with bold dots along the edges.

New

Twisted Tea New Logo

The modern malt drink logo has a more minimalistic look. The designers retained the arched “TWISTED TEA” lettering and kept the overall proportions of the letters but made them two-dimensional by removing the extra light blue shadows. The phrase “HARD ICED TEA” was changed to uppercase and stripped its framing stripes. All other text is gone, as is the big yellow sun in the background.

Now the sun’s silhouette is guessed in the negative space, which is created by seven short rays lined up in the form of a semicircle. The graphic element is directly above the inscription, so it seems that the sun is rising from the horizon.

Font and Colors of the Emblem

Twisted Tea Emblem

The rising sun is a powerful symbol with a positive meaning. This is the personification of dawn, courage, and vitality. And in some world religions, it is associated with powerful gods. Although the sun is a source of heat and light, the manufacturer of Twisted Tea uses its image to represent a cold drink. Such a contrast only enhances the logo’s impression and makes it memorable.

A bold sans-serif font was chosen for the beer brand logo. It has an individual design, and the letters in the name of Twisted Tea seem to be drawn due to imperfectly even lines and rounded corners. The words “HARD ICED TEA” are several times smaller than the top inscription but similar designs.

Twisted Tea Symbol

The first version of the emblem used basic colors (blue, yellow) and numerous shades, making the elements appear three-dimensional. The modern version is two-dimensional: it contains plain blue text and yellow rays of the sun.