Labello Logo

Labello Logo
Labello Logo PNG

Labello is a series of medical, protective, moisturizing lip balms made in Germany and Austria. At first, it was hygienic lipstick, but today it is divided into several women and men. She made her debut in the beauty market in 1909. Beiersdorf AG now owns the brand.

Meaning and History

Labello Logo History
Evolution of the Labello Logo

What is Labello?

Labello is the brand that the German company Beiersdorf AG uses to sell its lip balm stick. It was first introduced in 1909, which speaks of its rich historical heritage. The product line includes lip care products and glosses designed for cosmetic purposes.

Labello produces hygienic lipsticks with various additives that affect their color, fragrance, and care qualities. The basis of the assortment are balms-sticks for moisturizing, nutrition, treatment, and sun protection. And all because the company Beiersdorf AG, which manufactures these products, is sure: beauty cannot exist without health. Even the name of the trademark hints at the brand concept because it is formed from two words: “la” – from “labium” (“lip”) and “bell” – from “bellus” (“beautiful”). The last “o” is used for harmonic sounding, to get a pronunciation in the French manner.

The name Labello, which has Latin roots, inspired the designers for the logo of this brand. In total, three almost identical word marks were created. The first and third differ only in the shape of the initial letter “L.”

1922 – 1952

Labello Logo 1922-1952

The name of the trademark gave the beginning of the logo. It is this that is used as a key element. In this case, the word “labello” is compound and comes from two Latin stems: “lip” (labium) and “beautiful” (bellus). Symbology developers are designers from Juliasys Studio.

The personal identification mark of the Labello brand is its name. It was always present on the logo and represented a minimalistic version of the spelling. There are no serifs or curly elements in it – just a single word. Almost all letters are streamlined and rounded, except the two lowercase “ll.” They look like hygienic lipstick tubes – elongated, wide, rectangular. The first “L” differs from them because it is capitalized.

An individual typeface of the same name for the Labello trademark was developed by the studio Juliasys from Berlin. To do this, she used the Universalschrift font of the teacher Bauhaus Herbert Bayer. The color scheme of the logo depends on the background. If the label is light, the letters are dark blue; if dark, they are white.

1952 – 1963

Labello Logo 1952-1963

In 1952, the inscription became white and was inside a dark blue horizontal rectangle. The designers decided to play with the double “ll” interestingly, so they stylized them under the lips. They curved the first “l” into an open parenthesis and made the second letter sinuous, adding a depression in the center. The font remained the same: bold geometric grotesque with rounded glyphs.

1963 – today

Labello Logo

In the early 1960s, The authors of the logo slightly corrected it to make the inscription more readable. To do this, they reflected the colors, so now the brand name is dark blue, and the background, on the contrary, is light. The letter spacing has become a little wider. Again, the two lowercase “l” s look standard, like vertically elongated rectangles. And the capital “L,” located the very first, has acquired an updated look: its horizontal stroke is noticeably lengthened in the current version. Moreover, the inner side of the fold has the shape of a right angle.

Font and Colors of the Emblem

Labello Emblem

As a result of the evolution of the Labello logo, its font has hardly changed. The bold sans serif is still used today, mixing mid-20th-century typographic sans-serifs with Universalschrift-style glyphs. The author of the latter is the Austrian graphic designer Herbert Bayer. Based on the wordmark, a typeface called Labello was created. Juliasys developed it in collaboration with the Beiersdorf Brand Management team.

Labello Symbol

The color scheme also remains stable: it combines white and dark blue. But if the white inscription was on a blue background earlier, the opposite is true. This was done to improve the readability of the text.